Sunday, 13 March 2011

Book Recommendations - Dr Joyce Tyldesley

I must admit that my love of reading started around the time my interests in Egypt began. Before then i would have taken a mammoth effort for me to read anything. I was more interested in my hobbies.

Now, in 2011 as stated above- i love reading. A huge majority of my reading is Ancient Egypt related and i wish the bug had bitten me earlier. Every chapter of every book provides new information and this is what i crave.

I will share more of my own collection of books in time, but there's one person in particular who is able to grab my (occasionally short) attention span like no other and her name appears in the title of this post.

I was introduced the the work of Dr Tyldesley when i was given a book entitled "Egypt - How a lost civilization was rediscovered". Since then i have been sure to purchase further books by Dr Tyldesley.

What i personally enjoy from a Joyce Tyldesley book is the fact that they flow so well. Uncomplicated language is always essential to those "new" to Ancient Egypt, which i was. I was so gripped throughout that i was truly sad to eventually be looking at the last page of the book.

So i searched for more and was not to be disappointed. Of particular note to this blog are:

Hatchepsut - The Female Pharaoh, Penguin Books

Daughter of Isis - Women of Ancient Egypt, Penguin Books

Egypt's Golden Empire - The Dramatic Story of Life in the New Kingdom, Review

Egypt - How a Lost Civilization was Rediscovered, BBC Books


Regards,
Stuart

2 comments:

tim said...

Hi Stuart

I am in total agreement with you I always enjoy Dr. Tyldesley's works, however I would add a note of caution to Dr. Tyldesley's "The Mummy" which was filled with editorial mistakes that for me ruined the authors strong presentation!

Peace

Stuart Tyler said...

Hi Tim-

That does sound very unusual (regards editorial errors), but i will gladly take your word for it regarding the advice.

There are other books by Dr Tyldesley that are destined to end up on my bookshelf- so i can definately afford to avoid one or two.

That is of course if i ever decide to divert away from Hatshepsut.

Regards,
Stuart